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Corrosion Resistance

Aluminum and Zinc Alloys

| Author/ Editor: Dynacast / Isabell Page

Aluminum may be the best choice when a corrosion resistant alloy is needed that can withstand high temperatures. What further advantages offer aluminum and zinc die casting alloys for corrosion resistance?

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Dynacast shows the advantages of aluminum and zinc die casting alloys for corrosion resistance.
Dynacast shows the advantages of aluminum and zinc die casting alloys for corrosion resistance.
( Source: Pixabay / CC0 )

Corrosion resistance refers to how well a metal resists damage from oxidation or similar chemical reactions - usually over time. This means how well and how long a metal component can withstand certain environments while still maintaining functional integrity. For some, the aesthetics of a product are important, others rely on the functionality of the component for long-term wear.

Aluminum Die Casting & Corrosion Resistance

Aluminum may be the best choice when a corrosion resistant alloy is needed that can withstand high temperatures (200 degrees Fahrenheit or more). While exposing aluminum to extremely harsh conditions has always held an apparent risk of corrosion, aluminum components will typically last longer - compared to other die cast alloys.

Aluminum has the ability to “heal” itself over time even after the exterior of the component has corrosion. When component functionality is essential, aluminum is certain to withstand some of the toughest working environments.

Aluminum is often used to to manufacture electronic component housings, lighting fixtures, marine hardware, and antennas - among many other applications. While the raw aluminum material may not be as appealing to the eye, the durability of corrosion protection is top notch and it has several different options when it comes to surface finishes, including:

  • Anodizing
  • Painting
  • Powder coating
  • Teflon coating
  • Plating
  • E-Coating

Zinc Die Casting & Corrosion Resistance

All zinc-based alloys have excellent corrosion resistant properties; they just act a little differently than aluminum based alloys. While aluminum has the ability to “self-heal”, zinc will eventually break down and degrade over time. However, depending on the working environment, zinc has the ability to last just as long as aluminum and it has more options when it comes to surface finishes.

Zinc is often utilized for decorative and functional applications that do not require high temperatures (below 250 degrees Fahrenheit) such as consumer electronics, key fobs, and kitchen appliances - to name a few. Zinc alloys have all of the same surface finishing options as aluminum plus more, including:

  • Different plating options
  • Electrocoating (e-coat)
  • Chromate

Zinc plays an important role in the automotive industry. Zinc die casting is used wherever safety and maximum stability are required in a vehicle: Find out more about car parts made from zinc die casting.

This article was first published by Dynacast.

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